Tag Archive: disruptive technology


CDs and DVDs Not Worth Stealing

It seems that in Britain, burglars aren’t bothering to steal CDs and DVDs.  Why?

The reason is the falling value of physical media products. The average price of a CD album in Britain fell from £10.77 to £7.32 between 2001 and 2010, according to the BPI, a trade group—almost a halving, in real terms. And the dishonest get their music and films free, via the internet. DVDs are under pressure not just from piracy but also from video-on-demand services.

Instead they’re stealing computers, purses, jewelry, and anything else that has greater value.  Technology has disrupted traditional thievery as well.

Here is an interesting comparison of Twitter and blogs:

Blogging was a direct attack on MSM hegemony at both the micro (fisking) and macro levels (explanation space). I just don’t see Twitter as the same threat. It is a flood of unmermorable chatter that is easy to ignore. Blogging had the potential to break the power of the MSM guild. Bloggers, at their best, presented arguments. Arguments can both change minds on the immediate subject and undermine the credibilty of those establishment pundits who present weak cases on a regular basis.

I think that’s largely apt, but there’s more to it.  Both blog posts and tweets tend to be short, but tweets are too short to convey any real content or argument.  It’s the difference between e-mails and text (sms) messages.  There’s no inherent cap on e-mail length, but e-mails are kept short.  Text messages are capped at 160 characters.  With Twitter, there is no way to convey a complex idea in only 140 characters.

Blogs-and the web generally-permit authors to reach a much wider audience than they could otherwise–essentially disintermediating the gatekeepers of old.  Twitter is too short and is a closed system, so it cannot achieve the disruptiveness of blogs.

via.

Om Malik has an excellent post on why Kickstarter works (the comments are also worth reading).  He quotes Craig Mod because this really does say it all:

With Kickstarter, people are preordering your idea. Sure, they’re buying something tangible — a CD, a movie, a book, etc — but more than that, they’re pledging money because they believe in you, the creator. If you take the time to extrapolate beyond the obvious low-hanging goals, you can use this money to push the idea — the project — somewhere farther reaching than initially envisaged. And all without giving up any ownership of the idea. This — micro-seed capital without relinquishment of ownership — is where the latent potential of Kickstarter funding lies.

Billionaire Felix Dennis wrote, “ownership isn’t the important thing, it’s the only thing.”  Kickstarter allows creative talents to get seed capital without giving up equity.

Square allows small businesses and individuals to collect credit card payments.  It works by using a small hardware dongle that connects to the headphone jack of a mobile device.  The card is then swiped through the device and payments can be collected on the spot.  It works on iPhone, iPad, and Android phones.  Customers sign the device and a receipt is e-mailed to customer.

Square charges 2.75% of every transaction, but there are no monthly or additional fees.  They are now processing more than $1,000,000 in transactions a day.

Some Links:

Square Home Page: https://squareup.com/

http://mashable.com/tag/square/

http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/03/square-ipad/

http://gigaom.com/apple/square-goes-mainstream-with-apple-store-availability/

https://twitter.com/#!/Square

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