Latest Entries »

They sell them

Here’s a sample listing on eBay.

As lawyers, we are trained to accept mortality and the myriad of consequences it may have to others.  Lawyers need to accept that we will die… and so will everyone else.  It is in this vein that I appreciate the idea of PassMyWill.

It holds your passwords so that upon your passing, your heirs have access to all your online accounts and can enact your wishes.  It checks your social media accounts for activity, and after a specified period of inactivity sends an e-mail to you to check in.  If you do not respond to that e-mail, it assumes you’re dead and then gives your specified heir access to your passwords.

It’s an interesting idea and I’m sure that we haven’t heard the last of this.  For creativity points, I can even forgive founder Danil Kozyatnikov’s hat (he is from Siberia after all).  However it does remind me of this commercial from 2005.

TechCrunch has a full description and video interview with the founder.

In time for Halloween, it’s how to carve pumpkins using cookie cutters and a rubber mallet.  Looks much easier than the “old way.”

h/t Boing Boing

Smart Gadgets are Like Sleeper Cells in Your Kitchen: Most people don’t know their gadgets can already talk to one another, and even be controlled remotely by their utility company.”

GE has been shipping appliances for the past three years that are “smart.”  Smart meaning that they are equipped with ZigBee wireless capabilities so that your appliances can communicate with each other—and more ominously, with your utility company or anyone over the Internet.  Most of the ZigBee capable appliances aren’t even labeled as such.

This is potentially a huge privacy breech.  It seems that few of these appliances communicate back… yet.

(hat tip to the blogfather)

The fax machine is one technology that is past its time, but refuses to die.  Some people like the convenience of the fax, while others perceive a fax to be more secure than e-mail.  Doctors’ offices rely on fax and refuse to use e-mail because of the security concerns.

After hoping to be rid of faxes forever, I came to the realization that they’re here for the foreseeable future.  I signed up for HelloFax and have been quite satisfied with the customer service and the convenience of it thus far.  I was able to get a fax number in the 646 area code, and it integrates well with Dropbox.  It also lets you easily add a saved signature to a document without printing it out, signing it, and then scanning it before sending it.  Thumbs up from me.

Because you needed to find a use for those old 3.5″ floppies.

Nokia finally officially releases the N9, which is to be the first, last, and only MeeGo phone.  “The N9 features an interesting UI that’s controlled with a simple swipe. The buttonless smartphone features three home views (Applications, Events and Live Applications) that are designed to enable people to easily and swiftly navigate the interface.”  Unfortunately it looks like MeeGo is doomed.

Mac Trojan Alert

No more security from obscurity. Now that the Mac OS X platform has become more prevalent, malware has followed.  In the last two weeks, two new trojan horse threats to security.  The first presents itself as a PDF file, “which displays a Chinese-language document on the screen in an attempt to hide its background activity.”

The second is a bit more clever, it presents itself as a flash installer.  If a user tries to install the software, it deactivates security software on the user’s machine.

Apple has updated its anti-malware tools, so the threat is low, but the threats are increasing in number and sophistication.

Here is an interesting comparison of Twitter and blogs:

Blogging was a direct attack on MSM hegemony at both the micro (fisking) and macro levels (explanation space). I just don’t see Twitter as the same threat. It is a flood of unmermorable chatter that is easy to ignore. Blogging had the potential to break the power of the MSM guild. Bloggers, at their best, presented arguments. Arguments can both change minds on the immediate subject and undermine the credibilty of those establishment pundits who present weak cases on a regular basis.

I think that’s largely apt, but there’s more to it.  Both blog posts and tweets tend to be short, but tweets are too short to convey any real content or argument.  It’s the difference between e-mails and text (sms) messages.  There’s no inherent cap on e-mail length, but e-mails are kept short.  Text messages are capped at 160 characters.  With Twitter, there is no way to convey a complex idea in only 140 characters.

Blogs-and the web generally-permit authors to reach a much wider audience than they could otherwise–essentially disintermediating the gatekeepers of old.  Twitter is too short and is a closed system, so it cannot achieve the disruptiveness of blogs.

via.

No More Deposit on Kegs in NY

I know this isn’t exactly new news, but it’s good news.  The silly, absurdly-high keg deposits, which were supposed to protect our precious children from binge drinking have expired.

It turns out that the kiddies just purchased 30-packs instead.  My understanding is, of course, that 30-packs are only available in the finest of beers, such as Old Milwaukee Light.

%d bloggers like this: